Tuesday, September 13 - Wednesday, September 14, 2022 A Fracturing World: The Future of Globalization

The 2022 Global Order Colloquium, “A Fracturing World: The Future of Globalization,” investigated important policy questions regarding the future of the globalized world, with a focus on supply chains, digital currencies, the future of labor, and the role of the internet in connecting the global economy.

Across two days in September, academics, policymakers, world leaders, and practitioners convened at Perry World House to address pressing questions related to the future of globalization. Participants explored a variety of issues guided by a singular question: Is the world deglobalizing? There was no consensus among the participants. Instead, there were competing visions of the future of the global economic and political orders.

While participants differed on what is to come, they were all clear that action needs to be taken to ensure economic resiliency across regions. Economic decoupling between the great powers, such as China and the United States, looks unlikely, but creating more resilient value chains will provide more opportunities for growth in emerging markets. This convening brought together individuals from across the globe to discuss strategies for creating a more resilient and equitable world order.

“We have been bedeviled by crazy politics and crazy media. None crazier than Rupert Murdoch's Fox News here in the United States, which regrettably is even more influential in Australia than it is here. But fundamentally, science denial, climate change denial is the biggest problem that we have.”
Malcolm Turnbull, twenty-ninth prime minister of Australia
“When you tell us in Asia that we are looking at a deglobalized world, a fractured world, a bifurcated world, that is not a happy outcome for us. Because everyone . . . wants their people to be successful, and that really comes, we think, through economic interdependence, through economic links.”
Ashok Kumar Mirpuri, ambassador of Singapore to the United States
“The last few years, from the financial crisis to the pandemic to the war in Ukraine, have been . . . a scrim that has been pulled up on the vulnerabilities of our existing system.”
Rana Foroohar, global business columnist and associate editor, Financial Times